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Press Round-up (Articles, Reviews) about Everyday Is Like Sunday

Press Round-up (Articles, Reviews) about Everyday Is Like Sunday

National Post: Reviewed – It’s about poor, jobless, lonely Torontonian twentysomethings — and it’s smart (by Manori Ravindran)

Excerpt: “There’s an honesty and whip smart humour to the micro-budget Everyday Is Like Sunday that separates it from similar fare, and Moondi and Sloane have expertly distilled the disillusioned charm shrouding Toronto youth into snappy dialogue. If only every film about this doomed generation could be so smart.”

[Read the whole thing HERE]


National Post: ‘Minor-key moments are what populate people’s lives’: A Q&A with Everyday is Like Sunday director Pavan Moondi and producer Brian Robertson (by David Berry)

Excerpt:“Sometimes flossing can feel like starting over again. Everyday is Like Sunday begins with Mark (David Dineen-Porter) going about a morning-ish personal hygiene regimen that we can tell isn’t routine. But where standing in front of the mirror is habit for some, for Mark it’s start of a new chapter, an attempt to shake off his jobless, broken-up-with life and start fresh. That doesn’t quite happen, but over the course of the movie we’re treated to a lot of other small but potent scenes from life…What emerges is a pointed portrait of what being young and stuck in Toronto can feel like, a time and place where meaning is groped for, grasped and dropped again over the course of a coffee.”

[Read the whole thing HERE]


Toronto Star: Local indie comedy about conflicted, young people is smart, energetic [Review + Interview] (by Jason Anderson)

Excerpt: “Local indie comedy Everyday Is Like Sunday has a fresh take on quarter-life crises….What the result lacks in polish it makes up for in smarts, energy and local colour.”

[Read the whole thing HERE]


Exclaim: Everyday Is Like Sunday Review (by Kevin Scott)

Excerpt: “Marrying the same priority of comic banter over plot points as Whit Stillman, with the loose, improvisational style of Curb Your Enthusiasm, the film is rife with quotable lines and amusing pop-culture references. While all of the actors deliver refreshingly unaffected performances, Dineen-Porter has an especially magnetic on-screen presence that enlivens every scene with an air of unpredictability, while Thorburn is delightfully smarmy in his memorable supporting role.”

[Read the whole thing HERE]

Toronto Standard: Interview – Everyday Is Like Sunday but Every Day on Set Felt Like Monday (by Alan Jones)

Excerpt: “I had a chance to sit down and talk to Pavan about the challenges of making a micro-budget indie film, what it means to make a “Toronto film,” how music and musicians played an important role, and his complicated relationship with HBO’s Girls.”

[Read the whole thing HERE]

Playback: How iThentic Canada is being platform agnostic with content distribution (by Etan Vlessing)

Excerpt: “It’s a way to break through the clutter in terms of being high quality theatrical film and looking to find the right home for it, whether online and TV, so it doesn’t just launch into the abyss,” iThentic Canada CEO Jonas Diamond tells Playback.

[Read the whole thing HERE]

Dorkshelf: Everyday Is Like Sunday Review (by Andrew Parker)

Excerpt: “Porter, Gurfinkel, Osborne, and Martyn are particularly adept at reading a situation and feeling out the tone and emotion that needs to be given. It’s often like watching jazz musicians trying to find the rhythm in the middle of a jam session, but once they all get cooking things really come to life.”

[Read the whole thing HERE]

Torontoist: Rep Cinema this week (by Angelo Muredda)

Excerpt: “The best moments here showcase the warm, easygoing chemistry between the leads, but Dineen-Porter also excels in the film’s major set piece—a long, platonic first date that unfolds through tentative gestures and conversational feelers. Already a successful stand-up comic and comedy writer, under Moondi’s direction, Dineen-Porter also proves himself a fine actor.”

[Read the whole thing HERE]

Scene Creek: Review – Everyday Is Like Sunday (by Emily Andersen)

Excerpt: “Some of the most endearing moments in the film occur between the three friends. Whether they are sitting around cracking jokes, or dealing with depression, what the film successfully captures is the ups and downs that exist in meaningful relationships. Thus, what resonates the most in Moondi’s film is the ways in which friends push and support each other through trying times.”

[Read the whole thing HERE]

Film Army TGIS – Thank Goodness It’s Sunday [Review] (by Addison Wylie)

Excerpt: “What’s surprising and charming about Everyday is Like Sunday is how sharp it is. Whether it’s the observational talks about “nothing” or the quick-as-lightning off-the-cuff quips by the cast, Moondi’s honest comedy is clever and always finds a way to make you smile. It’s mumblecore meets Seinfeld.”

[Read the whole thing HERE]

Toronto Film Scene – Review: Everyday Is Like Sunday (by William Brownridge)

Excerpt: “Everyday Is Like Sunday is an incredibly well written comedy, with characters who feel like people you’ve known in life.”

[Read the whole thing HERE]

Review: National Post

Everyday Is Like Sunday, reviewed: It’s about poor, jobless, lonely Torontonian twentysomethings – and it’s smart

MANORI RAVINDRAN, SPECIAL TO NATIONAL POST | 15/08/13 5:43 PM ET

Link to Review

Everyday Is Like Sunday
Rating: 3/4
Director: Pavan Moondi
Writing Credit: Pavan Moondi, Michael Sloane
Cast: David Dineen-Porter, Coral Osborne,Adam Gurfinke, Bo Martyn, Nick Thorburn
Genre: Comedy
Duration: 90 minutes
Release date: Aug 16, 2013
Synopsis: A group of jobless, lonely Torontonians struggle to figure their lives out.

There’s a scene in Everyday Is Like Sunday where the film’s central character tries to pick up a girl in a dimly lit Toronto dive. “I’m really looking for something unconventional right now,” he begins. “Just a never-ending sleepover deal, weekends….” Has a piece of dialogue ever so perfectly encompassed dating for twentyomethings in Toronto?

Emerging adults be warned, Everyday Is Like Sunday hits close to home. Real close. Directed by Pavan Moondi — also of Toronto film collective The Seventh Art — and written by Moondi and Michael Sloane, the drama focuses on a group of friends wedged too comfortably between just-graduated bliss and the ennui of adulthood: the years when you’re at Sneaky Dee’s eating nachos and maybe trying to get laid when the glow of youthful optimism around you becomes too much to bear. Or when you use your degrees as coasters.

The film’s protagonist is Mark (David Dineen-Porter), a ne’er-do-well Torontonian whose life has been on a tailspin since quitting his job. Mark goes on numerous job interviews but can’t seem to land a position — a fact he’s overly enthusiastic to share. Six months into unemployment, he spends most daylight hours on his couch, where he’s occasionally joined by friends Jason (Adam Gurfinkel) and Flora (Coral Osborne), who are dating. Kind of. They’re in love, but the ambitious Flora is unhappy Jason works at a pizza joint – an annoyance that becomes a dealbreaker all too soon.

One night, Mark meets the gorgeous Anelie (Bo Martyn) at a bar and can’t believe his luck when she’s interested. After one night together, the guy is in raptures (apparently this happens, even in TO). But what does he do about it? “You’re supposed to wait eight weeks and then send her a Facebook message saying, ‘I like the way you move your body,’ ” advises Jason. For a time, Mark is transformed by love (or something), but timing is everything, and our protagonist soon realizes it takes more than a girl to change your life.

Millennial angst in gritty urban centres could warrant its own section in The New York Times. We’re poor, we’re jobless, we’re lonely, we get it. But there’s an honesty and whip smart humour to the micro-budget Everyday Is Like Sunday that separates it from similar fare, and Moondi and Sloane have expertly distilled the disillusioned charm shrouding Toronto youth into snappy dialogue. If only every film about this doomed generation could be so smart.

Review/Interview: Toronto Star

Everyday is Like Sunday: Local indie comedy about conflicted young people is smart, energetic: Interview

Everyday is Like Sunday is a scrappy but endearing low-budget feature about a trio of Toronto 20-somethings grappling with romantic woes and career uncertainties.

By: Jason Anderson Special to the Star, Published on Thu Aug 15 2013

Link to Review/Interview

Local indie comedy Everyday Is Like Sunday has a fresh take on quarter-life crises.

A scrappy but endearing low-budget feature about a trio of Toronto 20-somethings grappling with romantic woes and career uncertainties, the movie is populated by young people who are confused, conflicted and unfailingly sardonic. Since they often congregate in familiar bars, cafés and parks in the city’s west end, the characters may be recognizable as a particular variety of downtown hipster. But whatever you call them, don’t call them slackers.

“We never refer to them as that,” says Pavan Moondi, who co-wrote and directed Everyday Is Like Sunday. “You see the word a lot when you see shows or movies about people in their 20s but aren’t necessarily by people in their 20s. They often turn out like cartoon characters who revel in their aimlessness; they love not having a job and getting to wear a robe all day and drink beer all the time.

“I don’t really think that’s the case,” adds the Waterloo-bred filmmaker. “I’ve found that most people who are in that period of their lives want to get out of it. We were very mindful that our characters are trying to get their stuff together. They’re all making an effort, but it may be more difficult than they expected it to be.”

As young as they are — Moondi turns 28 next week — the makers of Everyday Is Like Sunday could hardly be considered slackers, either. The indie feature, which begins a run at the Carlton Cinema on Aug. 16, was shot over 12 days last summer and then edited over the next nine months, all on a slim budget that Moondi puts in the “teens.” Locations included Trinity Bellwoods Park and such Dundas West haunts as Unlovable and E.L. Ruddy Co. Cafe.

The film’s cast includes comedians like Nick Flanagan as well as musicians Nick Thorburn and Dan Werb. Stand-up comic and Laugh Sabbath regular David Dineen-Porter stars as Mark, a recently dumped and newly unemployed sad sack trying to find a new direction with the help of his roommates, a couple played by Coral Osborne and Adam Gurfinkel.

What the result lacks in polish it makes up for in smarts, energy and local colour. The eminently cool soundtrack is another plus, with songs by Wild Nothing and Eight and a Half sharing space with original contributions by the New Pornographers’ Kathryn Calder.

Moondi says Everyday Is Like Sunday was born out of the desire to make something that he and his friends might actually enjoy and relate to, a scarcity on screens in the days before Lena Dunham’s Girls proved there was a market for twenty-something fare.

Having first pitched it as a TV series, Moondi and Robertson then reconfigured it to be a web series. Three weeks before shooting began, they decided to see if it might work as a feature film as well. Unfortunately, their plans were derailed when their original lead — Justin Rice, an American best known for his role in Bujalski’s Mutual Appreciation — couldn’t get into the country due to an immigration issue. “We shot the first day without a lead actor and were really lucky to find David on day two,” says Moondi.

Despite all the turmoil, Moondi is happy with the finished product. “I feel like we gave it everything we had to pull it off,” he says.

Everyday Is Like Sunday opens at the Carlton Cinemas Aug. 16. The 7 p.m. screening is followed by a Q&A and an after-party.

Review: Exclaim!

Everyday is Like Sunday

Directed by Pavan Moondi
REVIEWS > FILM > AUG 15 2013
Rating: 8/10
By Kevin Scott

Link to Review

In its fiercely funny depiction of a specific brand of late 20s malaise brought on by the increasingly complicated world of dating and the half-hearted pursuits of something resembling a career, Pavan Moondi’s Everyday is Like Sunday is an understated gem. For the meandering characters, this is a time when the steadily encroaching responsibilities of adulthood are staved off by chasing fleeting connections with the opposite sex or sharing a drink (or three) with friends while engaging in spirited conversation.

The film centers upon a group of roommates living in Toronto, all still seeking some missing piece of the puzzle in achieving fulfillment. Mark (David Dineen-Porter) is six months out of a relationship and not only unemployed, has an impressive streak of unsuccessful job interviews under his belt. Jason (Adam Gurfinkel) and Flora (Coral Osborne) are in a serious relationship, though they are in the midst of a particularly tense period. He’s a fledgling musician making ends meet at a pizza place, while she’s a music journalist with a roving eye for Damien (Nick Thorburn, of the group Islands), the pretentious frontman of buzz band Tomorrow’s Phoenix.

While at a bar one night, Mark meets Anelie (Bo Martyn), an attractive student, and they end up spending a magical night talking into the wee hours of the morning without actually having sex. He celebrates the occasion in a hilarious scene by jumping into bed with Jason and Flora, proclaiming his excitement like a love-struck maniac. When he discovers in the coming weeks that things have clearly cooled off between him and Anelie, he naturally spirals into a pit of despair.

Marrying the same priority of comic banter over plot points as Whit Stillman, with the loose, improvisational style of Curb Your Enthusiasm, the film is rife with quotable lines and amusing pop-culture references. While all of the actors deliver refreshingly unaffected performances, Dineen-Porter has an especially magnetic on-screen presence that enlivens every scene with an air of unpredictability, while Thorburn is delightfully smarmy in his memorable supporting role. The use of Islands’ “Where There’s A Will There’s A Whalebone” to underscore a gleefully indulgent night of drinking is just one highlight of the film’s impressive soundtrack.

Moondi makes the most of a small budget in a surprisingly assured debut feature, shooting around the city at locations like the bar Unlovable and Queen Video. Considering the Canadian film industry is always desperate for intelligent comedies to balance our preoccupation with overwrought family dramas, this one succeeds by accepting its limitations.

In narrowing the focus to crafting realistically tangential exchanges between these friends, Everyday is Like Sunday finds the best way to portray lives that could accurately be described at this point as one long digression.
(iThentic)

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